Author: Holger Staudacher

In my last post I gave you an overview of server-side apps and how they relate to Tabris (previously RAP Mobile). In this post I want to dive into some technical details. I'll assume that you are a Java programmer and that you are familiar with servlets and tomcat. Not necessary but really helpful is some knowledge of OSGi. So, let's get started. To create Tabris Applications...

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JUnit and Eclipse are a great combination, but one thing that I missed every time I worked with JUnit4 was the code templates. Currently, Eclipse ships with pre-defined templates for JUnit3 but not for JUnit4. So, I wrote three basic JUnit4 templates that can be imported from the "Templates" Preference Page. Take a look at the screenshot below to see how to get there. The...

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In a recent blog post Peter Kriens commented that the OSGi service model is as important as object-orientation. I feel the same - I don't want to write software without this concept anymore. But for me, the service model only makes sense when it's used together with the modularity OSGi provides. I think the modularisation layer is the greatest advantage of the OSGi platform and...

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Editor's note: The Restfuse project is no longer maintained and has been archived. However, you can still access the sources on GitHub. As you might know from previous posts, most of my work time has something to do with the development of REST based systems. The systems we develop are mostly written in Java. To ensure that a system works, we have a step in our...

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With this effective Mockito Post I want to share a really simple pattern with you. We call this pattern "check answers" and we use it whenever we work with Mockito Answers. The code resulting from creating Mockito Answers generally looks ugly. But, as good programmers we care about test quality, right? :) Let's see how we can make better looking answers using the "check answer" pattern....

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This Effective Mockito Post will be IDE specific again but related to the last post on Mockito's spies. If you've read Part 3 you should now be familiar how to use them to "pseudo mock" statics. When writing code it often comes to a point where we want to debug using single step debugging. When using Mockito and especially when spies come into the game...

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In the previous Effective Mockito post we saw how to use the @Mock Annotation to get a clean test. In this post I want to show you how to use Mockito's spy mechanism to eliminate testing troubles with third party libraries. Testing is one of the most important things in software development. I assume you agree with me because you decided to read this blog post...

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As promised in the first part of the "Effective Mockito" blog series, I will concentrate on Mockito specifics in the followup posts. So, the main topic for Part 2 is Mockito's @Mock Annotation. When I write tests I try to follow an explicit pattern, called the build-operate-check pattern. This was described by Uncle Bob in his book "Clean Code" (Page 127, Chapter 9). The main idea...

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Last week I talked to a fellow developer, Frank Appel, about Mockito. We've been using this mocking library for over a year. We both agreed that of all the innovations we've tried in the last year or so, Mockito has boosted our coding productivity the most. With this blog series we want to share our experiences with Mockito. You see that I used the word...

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